Archive for the 'Michelangelo’s First Painting' Category

Oct 19 2009

Dear Michelangelo, Being Bad Never Felt So Good

I looked at Michelangelo’s first painting and said to myself: “Thank God, he didn’t start out as a genius.”

It is clear that Michelangelo’s “The Torment of Saint Anthony” cannot (and should not) be compared to his much later work like the “Sistine Chapel” or “David.” It lacks the technical skill and the refined style that belong to an older and more mature Michelangelo. This first painting, however, brought out a whole new dimension to this brilliant Renaissance man that many overlooked. If  “The Torment of Saint Anthony” achieves anything, it definitely succeeds in portraying Michelangelo as an authentic and genuine person, simply because his first work is not a masterpiece.

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Oct 19 2009

The True Power Of Color

When one first looks at Michelangelo’s First Painting, it is evident that it holds two different scenes. The first scene, which is the background, appears to be a perfect utopian world placed in a serene environment. This contrasts with the second scene, which is at the forefront of the painting. Saint Anthony, the demons, and the rocks are all painted with more vibrant colors creating a chaotic image, which is juxtaposed with the calming background. Continue Reading »

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Oct 17 2009

Coexistence of Good and Evil

Although Michelangelo Buonarroti‘s “The Torment of Saint Anthony” was based on Martin Schongauer’s engraving, I took away more from the painting than the engraving about good and evil. I see that even though both good and evil coexist simultaneously, as long as people remain confident and calm and resist all temptations, God, represented by nature in the painting, will help them. Looking at Schongauer’s engraving does not convey that feeling because it does not have a peaceful background and the calm expression of St. Anthony like Michelangelo’s. The contrast of the warm and cold colors in Michelangelo’s painting also contributes to the idea that horrible things can happen hiddenly and simultaneously even when the world seems so peaceful.

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Oct 14 2009

Michelangelo’s First Painting

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2221/3530624179_9baeac3934.jpghttp://thewholegardenwillbow.files.wordpress.com/2008/11/schongauer-martin-anthony103.jpg

Michelangelo’s “The Torment of Saint Anthony” is much more than a colored version of Martin Schonaguer’s “The Temptations of Saint Anthony”. Key alternations and added elements allow Michelangelo’s painting to convey a feeling completely different than the one delivered by the engraving that it was based on. Continue Reading »

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