Dec 11 2009

Careless or just a victim of circumstances

Published by under Short Films

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Looking at the events of the short movie it can be easily assumed that Zoe is an irresponsible mother. But is this assumption really justified? In my opinion she is a victim of her poor circumstances and bad choices. As can be inferred from some her action in the movie (the fight in the beginning of the move for the sake of her daughter or when in the bar the way she uses all her money to buy soda for her children in the bar), Zoe is trying hard to be a caring mother for her kids. Her poor state and her incapability to cope with the pressure of raising four small kids single handedly has led to her becoming a frustrated woman who longs for some personal, carefree time of her own.

4 responses so far

Dec 11 2009

Reflection of the Society

Published by under Looking at Music - MOMA

"Blonde/ Red Dress/ Kitchen"

This exhibit truly encompasses the importance and worth of music as a weapon. In the 1980’s and 1970’s the mixture of punk and rock music was used a s a tool for awakening and inspiring the young artists. The inspiration drawn from the music affected the artists to produce extraordinary works of art that reflected their personal beliefs, political views and social problems or issues of the 70’s and the 80’s.

One artwork that I found immensely fascinating was the Blonde/Red Dress/Kitchen from the series Interior, 1978 by Laurie Simmons. In this picture Simmons criticizes the typical American concept of domesticity in the 70’s and the 80’s. Her picture depicts a brightly colored, vibrant and warm kitchen with a single woman standing beside the kitchen table. In spite of the vibrancy or the warmth of the area the picture reflects the feelings of loneliness. The female working in the kitchen is alienated from the outside world. She is shackled by the norms and expectations of the society (the common viewpoint of seeing woman as a homemaker) and so is unable to experience the wide array of experiences in the outside world.

4 responses so far

Dec 11 2009

Unexpected

Published by under Joseph O'Connor

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I was felt that any work of art reflects the artist’s true self. I was in for a change of mind when I went to this reading by Joseph O’ Connor. He was not the as i pictured him to be. I never, never expected him to be so easy going – he even rapped about new york and Baruch. Further not only easy going but he also had tons of charisma that kept the (unexpectedly large number ) audience glued to their seats during his reading. I also like the fact that during his reading of his work he incorporated quoted from other people’s work like John Donne, Walt Whitman or his views other peoples’ work like Patty Smith. I think it just amplified his humbleness and down to earth nature.

His reading can be viewed at this link

4 responses so far

Dec 11 2009

Reading Out Loud

Published by under Joseph O'Connor

ZZJoseph_OConnorJoseph O’Conner is not only a great writer but also very funny. To me, I believe that readings are very important for authors. This way many listeners would understand the way that the author wants them to. During his reading, I thought it was great to listen to him read his work the way he intended others to hear it. Including his jokes and the way he talked normally and to the audience, as he spoke between each of his readings I could sense a part of him in the stories he wrote. It was very interesting to be able to relate the author with his work.

6 responses so far

Dec 11 2009

Me, Making Art Out of Me.

Published by under Cultural Passport Assigments

selfSure, it isnt unusual to see how what an artist sees before he paints: could be flowers, a landscape, another person. But how do these artists see themselves? “The Lens And the Mirror:Self Portraits…” was an exhibition at the MET that allowed the viewer to tap into the head of the artist and see how he/she views him/herself.

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3 responses so far

Dec 11 2009

Capture the Moment

Published by under ICP Exhibit

museum_landingLooking at all the photographs throughout the International Center of Photography, each one seemed to amaze me. One of the pictures that had caught my attention the most was when a lot of people were in the picture and all of them seemed to be doing something different. It was amazing how the photographer could capture such a moment. Even with so many different people, the photographer took a great picture as we get to observe how so many things go on at the same time. I also watched the video of guys that kept talking as they tried on new clothes. I thought this one was very interesting how each of them thought how important clothes and looks were to them. For them, it seems that brand names is the most important thing in their life. Throughout, there was a wide variety of photographs including weird, funny and meaningful ones.

2 responses so far

Dec 11 2009

My Inspiration? My Admiration?

Published by under Cultural Passport Assigments

Richard Avedon’s photography in the MoMA is something that I couldn’t walk away from.  A photographer myself, I have a distinct and very narrow-minded opinion on what “good” photography should look like.  In fact, most pictures I see I don’t like – I always find a way to criticize them and find a flaw.

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One response so far

Dec 11 2009

Shake your body (the more the better!!!!!!!)

Published by under Fela!

http://blog.ctnews.com/meyers/files/2009/10/fela.bmp

As the dancers shook their bodies on the stage—-their dance and the rocking my music completely shook my senses. I was mesmerized and so was Ben Brantley! As Mr. Ben Brantley puts it “this is music that gets into your bloodstream, setting off vibrations you’ll live with for days to come. That the beat goes on, insistently and persuasively, makes “Fela!” nigh impossible to resist.” I completely agree with Brantley in that the show was truly irresistible. And as i watched the rest of the audience members standing and dancing “one o’ clock and two o’ clock” along with Fela I knew that this was true for each and every person sitting in the audience.  I will definitely remember the experience of seeing such an involving and vibrant Broadway show forever. Further what made the show an excellent package of entertainment was that the dance and the music was not just for fum but had a underlying purpose of revolt against the oppression in Nigeria. HIdden symbolism was all around – in the words of the song, in the portraits of civil leaders on the walls of the shrine, in the shrine itself, in the life lessons of Fela’s mother – this play was no foolish endeavor to draw the audience solely for it’s entertainment value but a skilled art form that payed a worthy tribute to the man who fought for an equally worthy cause (freedom for the people of his country from the oppressive government).

3 responses so far

Dec 11 2009

Girl vs. Boy, Red vs. Blue, or Cat vs. Dog?

Published by under Cultural Passport Assigments

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At the Folk Art Museum, I  find “Girl in Red Dress with Cat and Dog” (yes, that’s the title of the painting); I, then, decided to walk up another flight of stairs and find “Boy in Blue Dress with Dog.” Comparing the two is fun, yet questionable. Boys are almost always associated with boys and red is associated with love, thereby fitting with a girl’s portrait. I wasn’t all excited about this though. There’s always so much generalizing and assuming! Okay, okay.. I’ve got to tell you guys something; when Solana and I walked past the “Boy in Blue Dress with Dog”, I thought it was a girl. The artist draws girly eyes, rosey cheeks, and a tenderly-held  flowers. I couldn’t tell the differences and not sure if that was a good thing or not. Art is supposed to be distinctful; the two paintings weren’t. I like authenticity and originality, something like me and you. 😉

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6 responses so far

Dec 11 2009

More!! We Want More!!

Published by under Fela!

fela12Even though Fela! was somewhat hard to follow for me, this broadway was the best I had ever seen. It was exciting, interactive and very funny. It was everything great mixed into one giant performance.  In the short time of the show, it was able to explain the life of Fela. What was most interesting to me was the music. The music was new and fresh. It was amazing how Fela influenced others threw the music he created. With the power of music, many began to follow Fela’s ideas and actions. Through all the laughs, singing and dancing, Fela was able to show us a deep meaning behind his actions. Trying to create his own country, free of the Nigerian government, Fela’s actions were brave and influential. With the support of his mother, Fela had been able to get through a lot, as there was a great significance in the picture of Funmilayo on the wall throughout the show. It was a great performance that taught me much about the life of Fela.

3 responses so far

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